This list features books with neurodiverse characters, spreading awareness for readers wanting to find representation and/or educate themselves further on the topic

WINNER of the 2017 Next Generation Indie Book Awards for Children’s Fiction! Meet nine-year-old Katie, the little sister who feels like a big sister. Her eleven-year-old brother, Mikey, has autism. Katie can ride a two-wheeler, but Mikey’s bike still has training wheels. Katie rides the bus to school, while Mikey takes the special needs van. When a new student with special needs joins Katie’s class, she notices that some kids just don’t “get it” about autism and other disabilities. Discover how Katie, along with her friends Lauren and Bella, are determined to make a difference at their school.


An uplifting story about the power of art, finding your voice, and telling your story even when you’re out of step with your peers. Aaron Slater loves listening to stories and dreams of one day writing them himself. But when it comes to reading, the letters just look like squiggles to him, and it soon becomes clear he struggles more than his peers. When his teacher asks each child in the class to write a story, Aaron can’t get a single word down. He is sure his dream of being a storyteller is out of reach . . . until inspiration strikes, and Aaron finds a way to spin a tale in a way that is uniquely his. 


A pitch-perfect, heartwarming middle grade novel about growing up, finding yourself, and loving people with everything you’re made of. Twelve-year-old Libby Monroe is great at science, being optimistic, and talking to her famous, accomplished friends (okay, maybe that last one is only in her head). She’s not great at playing piano, sitting still, or figuring out how to say the right thing at the right time in real life. Libby was born with Turner Syndrome, and that makes some things hard. But she has lots of people who love her, and that makes her pretty lucky. 

Holly loves doing experiments and learning new things in science class! But when she finds out the next experiment is making slime, she's worried. Slime is made with glue, and glue is sticky. Holly has sensory issues because of her autism and doesn't like anything sticky! With help from family and her teacher, Holly receives the accommodations and encouragement she needs to give slime a try. 

Beloved author of The Lesson and Will You Still Be My Daughter? Carol Lynn Pearson is known for her heartfelt, sometimes tear-jerking poetry and stories. Her newest title will enchant children with a sweet, tender poem about loving and accepting others, no matter what they look like, where they come from, or what their age and abilities are. 

Is Little Bear ignoring his friends when they say hi, or is something else going on? A discovery opens new doors in a tale that will delight kids with deafness and all children learning to navigate their world. Little Bear feels the world around him. He feels his bed rumble when Dad Bear wakes him up in the morning. He feels the floor shake when his teacher stomps to get his attention. But something else is missing, like when his friends tell jokes that he isn’t sure he understands, or when all around him Little Bear hears the question, “Can bears ski?” Then, one day, Dad Bear takes him to see an “aud-i-olo-gist,” and Little Bear learns that he has been experiencing deafness and will start wearing hearing aids. Soon he figures out what that puzzling refrain is: “Can you hear me?” Little Bear’s new world is LOUD and will take some getting used to, but with the love and support of Dad Bear, he will find his way. 

A boy's wonderful mama takes him zooming everywhere with her, because her wheelchair is a zooming machine. 

Link to Disability Awareness Book Lists for students, parents, and the community